It's a Writer Thing

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This mysterious realm looked similar—no, identical—to the one I had painted as a child.

writeworld:

Writer’s Block


In one sentence is the spark of a story. Ignite.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a memory about this sentence. Write something about this sentence.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

Word List: Weather

writingbox:

  • blizzard
  • chill
  • cloudy
  • cold
  • cyclone
  • dew
  • drizzle
  • dry
  • flood
  • fog
  • freeze
  • frost
  • hail
  • heat
  • hot
  • humidity
  • hurricane
  • ice
  • lightning
  • moon
  • precipitation
  • pressure
  • rain
  • rainstorm
  • rainbow
  • rainy
  • sleet
  • snow
  • snowstorm
  • snowy
  • storm
  • sunny
  • thunder
  • thunderstorm
  • tornado
  • tsunami
  • typhoon
  • warm
  • windy

samswritingtips:

A breakdown of medieval armor, since a lot of pieces are required to create a full suit.

writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

Hi! I hope you haven't answered this before, but I was wondering, what do you think about books that skip large periods of time? I have to do this a couple of times in mine, but it just feels like I'm trying to avoid character development and the transition just doesn't look right to me. What do you think is the best way to do this?

Anonymous

clevergirlhelps:

Regardless of where or for how long you’re going to skip, you’re going to miss some character development. There are two things you can do to prevent this:

  1. Don’t skip major events. If, for example, falling in love transforms your character from a careless rogue into a paranoid homemaker, you should cover that because it represents a large change. Compare that to your character becoming a little more cynical after they are unfairly denied a promotion. Becoming a little cynical does not dramatically change your character. 
  2. Hint at major skipped events. I’m sure there are scenes in the skipped timeline that play a major role in the character development. If you’re not going to include them as part of the story, then hint at their occurrence via dialogue and memories (not necessarily the dialogue/memories of the character you’re developing). I’d advise against doing a flashback - God forbid, a flashback dream sequence - unless absolutely necessary. Just drop hints here and there so the readers can guess what generally went on.

When you’re aiming for a transition, you’re looking for two points that are somehow related so you can string them together. A good transition point is: at the end of a character arc, at the end of a plot arc, at a suspenseful part of a character arc, and at a suspenseful part of a plot arc. Assuming you’re using the same characters (who know the same things), your later scene should reference back to the scene before the transition.

keyboardsmashwriters:

Crafting a Strong Character Voice || Part 5

Exercise 1 –
Take the above photo. Describe it with your own style and your own literary flair. Bring the scene to life. Give it its own characterization. Capture a moment.

Exercise 2 –
Now, describe the scene from the eyes of one of your characters. Don’t be afraid to borrow those moments of gold you write in exercise 1, but make sure to stay absolutely true and honest to the voice of the character.

Bonus –
Describe the scene from the eyes of the protagonist.

Goal –
A big part of what makes a story stand out is character voice. Your own personal style changes as you do, and a character’s voice changes as the character does. When the two come together, there’s potential for literary magic, but bringing out and differentiating between different character voices takes lots of practice and even more reading.

Write for yourself, but also take time to write with the intention of improving skills. There’s reading for pleasure, and then there’s reading like a writer. The same applies to writing: write for pleasure, then write to improve. Experiment in these exercises. Try things you haven’t tried before.

Remember, the image is meant to generate ideas, so it’s intentionally vague. If you’re not used to writing about the subjects in the image, good. Write something you’ve never written before. Push yourself.

Need some help? Check out the guide on character voice, or look at the Voice & Style Summer Camp exercises for additional tips!

Share your pieces, however perfect or raw, with other KSWers by posting under the “ksw exercise” tag!

Need an Example? Here’s a Poor One –

Read More

Describing the Smell of Blood

writeworld:

The answer to this question will depend on a few factors:

  1. Which blood is being described.
  2. Who is doing the describing.
  3. How fancy you want to get.

Read More

amandaonwriting:

Writing Comic - Writing Rage

amandaonwriting:

Writing Comic - Writing Rage

avajae:

Writability: A Note to New Writers

Deciding you want to be a writer is scary. It’s also exciting, depending on the day of the week, and difficult, and fun and sometimes overwhelming. On especially interesting days, it’ll be all five.

I often get e-mails from new writers asking for tips—something to help them write their book, whether they’ve just started, haven’t started, have tried and failed to finish several times, or are just stuck with a particularly challenging WIP. So I’m going to share with you the advice I repeat most often: finish the book. 

IMO, the first book is the hardest to finish. It’s the one where you fight the most doubts about your ability to finish a novel, where you haven’t yet figured out the process that works best for you, where you question whether or not you’re really an actual writer. (Those doubts, struggles and questions never really go away, but they’re often the loudest when writing that first ever book).

Finishing a book isn’t easy. There are going to be days when you seriously doubt your ability to reach the end. There will be days when you think your writing completely sucks, days when you hate your characters or your plot or you think your dialogue is stupid. There will be days when you start to wonder if maybe you should give up and try something else.

Don’t give up. Don’t stop. Don’t look back.

The truth is, your first draft will probably suck. Many published writers will tell you that their first drafts are laughably bad, but here’s the thing to remember: it doesn’t matter. The first draft isn’t about getting it right, it’s about getting it done. That’s it.

Next, you need to be readingThis isn’t optional. Read the popular and obscure, read whatever you can get your hands on, and most importantly,read the genre and category that you’re writing in. You need to know what’s out there in order to be able to write a book that’ll fit on the shelf. Not only that, but you’ll discover so much when reading—for example, I never would have learned how much I love dual-POV novels or Sci-Fi if I hadn’t read Beth Revis’s Across the Universe.

Read read read read read. You won’t regret the time you take to keep aware of what’s on the market (but I promise you, you will regret it if you skip this step).

Now you’re writing and reading. Awesome. The next thing you need to accept is you have to edit. A lot.

One of the best things I’ve done for my career thus far is to learn to love to edit. That’s right—I didn’t always love it, in fact, I kind of skimped on it with my first couple WIPs (learn from my mistakes, writers: do not skimp).

But even if you don’t learn to love to edit, you need to accept that it’s going to be a part of your life if writing is truly what you want to do. And yes, for those of you editing while first drafting, you will still have to edit again. Most likely several times.

Related to this note, you need critique partners that aren’t close friends or relatives. You need feedback from other writers, and not only that, you need the experience of critiquing someone else’s work. Make the effort to find some good critique partners, because they are truly invaluable to the writing process.

The next unfortunate truth is you’re going to get rejectedThis doesn’t apply to just new writers—you’ll face rejection throughout your career, regardless of where you’re at. You’ll be rejected by agents, by editors and by negative reviews.You’ll learn the difference between a form rejection and a personalized rejection (and you’ll learn that personalized rejections are a thing to be cherished).

You may hear a lot of no’s for many many years before you hear your first yes (for me, it took eight years to hear the yes that landed me an agent). You may have to trunk manuscripts and write book after book that you then have to put away, but I promise you, this is normal and it’s okay. It’s not a waste of time—you’re learning and growing and beginning to get a feel for the tough part of the writing life.

The good news is this: the writing community is wonderful. I can’t encourage you enough to get involved—start a Twitter and follow other writers, read writing blogs, check out forums, whatever you have to. The writing community is full of people in all stages of their journey, people who understand the rejection and the tough days when you want to give up on this writing dream. People who are there to help you when they can and encourage you when you’re feeling down. People who will dance with you when good things happen and beam when you share good news.

If you don’t listen to anything I’ve written, please please please do this:get involved with the writing community. You’ll learn so much from that alone.

Finally, know that you are, actually, a writerIt doesn’t matter if you don’t have an agent, or a book contract, or a published book. It doesn’t matter if you don’t write every day, or you’re not getting paid, or no one knows your name. If you write and you love to write, you’re a writer. Embrace it. Love it. Live it.

Research Masterpost part 1 (Fairytales/Folktales, Arthurian Legends)

elumish:

General

Wikipedia.org

Project Gutenberg

Fairy Tales/Folktales

http://www.worldoftales.com/ 

http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html

http://hca.gilead.org.il/ 

http://germanstories.vcu.edu/grimm/grimm_menu.html 

http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/japan.html 

http://www.storynory.com/archives/fairy-tales/ 

http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0425c.html#jacobs 

http://park.org/Korea/Pavilions/PublicPavilions/KoreaImage/hangul/litera/

http://library.uoregon.edu/ec/e-asia/reada/dent.pdf 

http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/the-chinese-fairy-book-1921/ 

http://www.gymmuenchenstein.ch/stalder/texts/reading_1fi/african_fairy_tales.htm 

http://www.mainlesson.com/display.php?author=orczy&book=hungarian&story=_contents 

http://www.tradestonegallery.com/?content=fairytales 

http://www.fairy-tale.info/index.php/action_show_id_NDl8PDwmPj58NTN8PDwmPj58NTR8PDwmPj58.html 

http://www.fairytales247.com/catalog/tanzanian-folktales/ 

http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/ift/ 

http://www2.hn.psu.edu/faculty/jmanis/joseph-jacobs/indian-fairy-tales.pdf 

http://americanfolklore.net/folklore/mexican-folklore/ 

http://www.eagleservices.ca/1stlorette/Html/MexicoWeb/FolkTales.pdf )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aarne%E2%80%93Thompson_classification_system 

Arthurian Legends

http://www.timelessmyths.com/arthurian/housearthur.html 

http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/documents/Arthurian_Genealogy.pdf 

http://www.legendofkingarthur.co.uk/genealogy.htm 

http://www.heroofcamelot.com/introduction 

http://www.blaenau-gwent.gov.uk/8035.asp 

http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/index_welsh.html 

http://www.arthuriana.co.uk/ 

http://www.arthuriana.org/ 

http://d.lib.rochester.edu/camelot-project 

http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A533350 

http://www.heroicage.org/ 

http://www.facesofarthur.org.uk/bibliograrth.htm 

http://d.lib.rochester.edu/teams/text/benson-and-foster-king-arthurs-death-introduction 

http://www.caerleon.net/history/arthur/page2.htm 

http://www.britannia.com/history/arthur/excalibur.html 

http://csis.pace.edu/grendel/projs993a/arthurian/excalibur.htm 

http://www.timelessmyths.com/arthurian/excalibur.html 

http://www.timelessmyths.com/arthurian/vulgate.html 

http://www.lancelot-project.pitt.edu/lancelot-project.html 

http://www.ancienttexts.org/library/celtic/ctexts/triads4.html 

http://www.ancienttexts.org/library/celtic/ctexts/culhwch.html 

Next masterpost I’ll go over Arthurian Legend characters and naming characters. Any broken links or suggestions for later masterposts?

Did you think I was joking?

writeworld:

Writer’s Block


In one sentence is the spark of a story. Ignite.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a memory about this sentence. Write something about this sentence.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

I just started a freelance sports writing gig for a newspaper. Do you have any advice and tips?

Anonymous

thewritingcafe:

  • Deadlines: Pay attention to deadlines. When you have a job, you need to meet these deadlines if you want to keep that job. Get your work done early to give yourself enough time to write multiple drafts.
  • Statistics: Sports is all about statistics, facts, and name. Double check all of these if you use them. Triple check them. I’m assuming you have an editor or a fact checker to look them over as well, but get in the habit of getting it right the first time around. It’ll save everyone time.
  • Objectivity: Try to stay objective. This might vary based on who you are writing for and what they want you to write, but you don’t want to piss off all of your readers. Stay objective where you can. If you’re allowed to give your personal thoughts and opinions, do so after you give an objective overview and explain why these are your thoughts.
  • Editor: Don’t fight with your editor if they want to change something. Work alongside them and negotiate in a professional manner if you disagree with something.

Five Examples of Great Sports Writing

Sports Journalism

Sports Writing

Writing Sports Articles

Eight Tips for Writing Better Sports Stories

What Hits a Home Run in Sports Writing? (podcast)

Writing beyond your outline

itsonlythefirstdraft:

31 GIFs That Will Make You Laugh Every Time

writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

a-p-h-belarus:

phrux:

adamsforthought:

dungeonsandpendragons:

Commonly confused medieval weapons, a powerpoint by me.

Now stop screwing them up, seriously, or I will put a medieval weapon in your head.

Tumblr is endearing me to being lectured at in Comic Sans

THIS is a WAR SCYTHE, a scythe actually used in combat. Notice it is not a useless piece of shit and is an actual functional weapon.

The only reason why death is pictured with a FARMING scythe is because he harvests souls.

now i can kill ppl and know what im killing them with thank you

(Source: redandveryverydarkgray)